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Joe Bataan – Gypsy Woman (LP)
Gypsy Woman is Joe Bataan's 1967 debut album featuring the King of Latin Soul's classic swinging and vibrant sounds, led by the musical direction of Fania Records cofounder Johnny Pacheco. The title track is a nod to The Impressions' 1961 hit of the same name. Other highlights include the boogaloo jam "So Fine," and Bataan's signature, soulful tune "Ordinary Guy." This reissue features all-analog mastering from the original tapes by Kevin Gray at Cohearent Audio and is pressed on 180-gram vinyl.

36,90 €*
Mista Savona – Havana Meets Kingston Part 2 (DOLP)
"Havana Meets Kingston Part 2"ist ein zeitloses Album, das keinem aktuellen Pop-Trend verfolgt. Der modernste Track ist "Beat con Flow", ein sehr kubanischer uptempo Disco-, Funk-, Soul-Hybrid mit Cimafunk, der inzwischen ein Superstar in seiner Heimat ist.

32,90 €*
VA - Instrumental Gems Vol.3 - Spanish Bossa Nova 1972/1977 (LP)
Limited Edition 500 Copies

22,90 €*
VA – ¡Naino, Naino! Spanish Gipsy Soul Funk Disco 1971/1978 (LP)
Limited Edition 500 CopiesFlamenco rumba fusion which in the hands of intrepid producers becomes Catalan rumba under the influence of sounds coming from Cuba and Puerto Rico in the early 1960s, rumba pop under the umbrella of the British Invasion and American pop of the late 1960s, and disco rumba with the arrival funk and disco from the USA in the mid-1970s. Everything happens thanks to a flourishing record industry located mainly in Barcelona with labels such as Belter, Discophon, or Vergara. After the death of the fascist, sanguinary dictator Paquito Franco in November 1975, the international record industry establishes in Madrid through major labels CBS, RCA, and a new fusion led by producer Jose Luis de Carlos and labeled as gipsy rock, caño roto or, in the flamenco field, especially in couplets, flamenco pop. As Oriol Farràs pointed in the previous volume (ADC 003LP, 2108), rumba moved from tablaos to discotheques, understanding the concept of discotheque at that time with a slightly different meaning and less conditioned style-wise. The selection on offer here complements volume one. Starting with an A side packed with floor fillers, with Peret's "Chavi" as the top example of gypsy funk fusion under production of Josep María Bardagí and Josep "Rabbit Rumba" Cunill, and four examples of the answer to that sound as produced by Jose Luis de Carlos, showing the four cardinal points of this fusion success: Las Grecas, Los Chorbos, El Luis, and Chango. De Carlos transforms the sound of Madrid's flamenco artists spicing it with soul, rock, glam, dub, funk, disco, and gospel. These five opening tunes alone could feed a whole

22,90 €*
VA – Flamenco Pop - 14 Flamenco Pop Beat Big Hits 1968/1977 (LP)
Limited Edition 500 Copies Flamenco Pop, the result of the pop mutation of flamenco, term coined in the late 60s by Alfonso Santisteban, Adolfo Waitzman & Augusto Algueró who defined the genre and took it to the charts. The influences were many: from couplets to boleros, from Bristish beat to lounge music. This compilation features spanish top folkloric mod squad: Carmen Sevilla, Encarnita Polo, Rosa Morena, Dolores Abril, Carmen Flores, Dolores Vargas “La Terremoto” and La Polaca. Also Manolo Escobar, Juanito Valderrama, El Principe Gitano, El Noy, Moncho, Richart and Los Nevada. Blow Your Mind, primo.

22,90 €*
Manu Chao, Chalart58 – Inna Reggae Style (LP)

23,90 €*
Orchestre Les Volcans du Benin – Vol. 1 (LP)

26,90 €*
VA - Saturno 2000-La Rebajada De Los Sonideros 1962​-​1983 (DOLP)

37,90 €*
Cochemea – Vol 2: Baca Sewa
Includes code for free MP3 download on a coupon.Limited Edition, Amethyst Color

29,90 €*
VA - 90 Degrees Of Shade Hot Jump-Up Island Sounds From The Caribbean Vol 2 (DOLP)
This is the sound of independence, righteous and hot jump-up sounds from the 1950s and 60s, an exciting period of endless new musical styles that would travel across the world – Mento, the Jamaican precursor to reggae; mambos and descargas from Cuba, Dominican merengue, Haitian compas – and more.

34,90 €*
Robert Y Su Banda - Soy La Ley (LP)
"Released in 1978, “Soy la ley” by Robert y su Banda is an obscure but sought-after slab of Colombian salsa dura with the special distinction of having the “original” version of Álvaro José “Joe” Arroyo’s monster hit ‘Rebelión’ hidden in plain sight on the second side of the record. The band’s leader, Roberto Antonio Urquijo Fonseca, is still active today and, hailing from Barranquilla, Colombia, is as steeped in the costeño sound of cumbia as he is in salsa. Roberto certainly has a perfect voice for salsa, bringing to mind that of the Boricua super star sonero Héctor Lavoe. In fact, Roberto y su Banda are well remembered by salsa fanatics in Medellín because they were the other act (along with Piper Pimienta and his orchestra) that opened the first Colombian performance of Héctor Lavoe, on the afternoon of July 29, 1978 at the Plaza de Toros La Macarena. Roberto was also one of the vocalists and co-founders (with Hernando Barbosa) of the short-lived La Bandita, where he was known as “Urquijo” and had a big hit with ‘Libre soy’ in 1979. Prior to that, Roberto replaced Juan Piña in Los Hermanos Martelo in 1975 and later joined Grupo Raíces in the 1980s for a couple of albums. He also became a vocalist with Grupo Niche when Alfonso “Moncho” Santana quit, though he left without appearing on any Niche releases. On this album the previously mentioned ‘Rebelión’ of Joe Arroyo kicks off side two but bears the completely different title ‘El Mulato’ and is credited to Adela Martelo de Arroyo, Joe Arroyo’s wife at the time (Arroyo was signed exclusively to Discos Fuentes). The arrangement, by Enrique Aguilar, is also quite different from ‘Rebelión’ with an introduction that sounds inspired by Tite Curet Alonso’s composition ‘Plantación adentro’ (from “Willie Colon Presents Rubén Blades Metiendo Mano!”, 1977) but it contains all the elements of Joe’s later global smash with the exception of being rhythmically more of a cumbia than a salsa. At the time it was not promoted by Zeida as a hit, with only one 45 single being released from the album, featuring two songs by Colombian composers, ‘Hijo de gitana’ (a bouncy cumbia by Juvenal Viloria) and a smoking salsa version of Joaquín Bedoya’s ‘Déjala que se vaya’. Arroyo is said to have presented ‘El mulato’ to Fruko (his bandleader at the time), and it was recorded but was shelved due to a vocal take that Fruko deemed sub-par. When Arroyo left Fruko y sus Tesos and formed his own band, La Verdad, producer Isaac Villanueva looked through the Fuentes archives for material and stumbled on the original Fruko recording. Arroyo decided to re-record the whole song, changing the intro (to avoid any legal issues with Curet Alonso) and the title to clarify the main theme: the injustice of slavery and black resistance to it. And so, with Michi Sarmiento’s brilliant arrangement plus La Verdad’s modern reinterpretation of the nearly decade old tune, ‘Rebelión’ became a mega-hit even in Asia and Africa and Arroyo’s fame shot around the world and made him the international legend he remains to this day, eight years after his untimely demise. Besides the aforementioned ‘El mulato’, the title track ‘Soy la ley’ is a dance floor burner and comes from the pen of Joe Arroyo as well, as does ‘Mi cariño no espera’, which is another cumbia/salsa hybrid. To these ears, one of the voices singing coro (chorus) on the album sounds a lot like Joe Arroyo, who was Roberto’s friend from back in the early 70s when Arroyo sang with Colombia’s La Protesta. Aside from the Arroyo originals, there is the super hot guaguancó ‘Son Candela’ by the venerable Cuban singer/composer Joseíto Fernández, the guajira son ‘En la inmensa soledad’, made famous by Los Compadres, the upbeat sounding lament ‘Preso sin sentencia’, originally by Puerto Rican plenero and percussionist Rafael Ortiz Escuté (aka Joe Pappy), plus an absolutely burning version of Mexican crooner Armando Manzanero’s 1967 hit ‘Aquel señor’. The record is rounded out by the salsa tune ‘Si ella pregunta por mí’, which was covered in 1980 by Orquesta Borinquen."

19,90 €*
António Sanches - Buli Povo (LP)
Analog Africa reissue for Record Store Day 2018 Limited edition 1000 copies,incl. Mp3 Download Code

27,90 €*
Baobab Gouye-Gui De Dakar ‎- Viva Bawobab S1-Si Bou Odja (LP)
In the same year, 1981, that Orchestra Baobab recorded their second album under the direction of budding young Senegalese producer, Ibrahima Sylla, the Japanese electronics company Sony, held a press conference in Vienna to announce their version of the Compact Disc. In attendance was Herbert von Karajan, conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic and the urban myth – albeit possibly true – that the maximum length of 74 minutes of music then available for a CD, was because this allowed the entire length of Karajan's recording of Beethoven's 9 th Symphony, to fit on one disc.Fast forward 12 years to London in 1993 and Sterns' release of Baobab's 'Bamba' CD which combined tracks from the two vinyl albums 'Mouhamadou Bamba' & 'Viva Bawobab S1/ Si Bou Odja', and Sterns had a problem. What tracks to keep, what to drop and once you'd decided that, how to fit them all onto a CD in under 74 minutes? The solution was to edit, primarily by fading early, one of the longest tracks of the selection.Accordingly the first track of this album, “Sibou Odia”, was reduced from 14'35” to 13'41” and, in most cases, none were the wiser as the suggestion to call the CD version an “Edit” had been dropped on the basis that nobody would believe a 13+ minutes track was an edit! Now of course, such restrictions don't exist and either via a repiication of its original format on vinyl, or through the digital medium, you can hear the full-length version as first intended.And it's fascinating, not just this track but the whole album. The band is young, energetic and confident of their abilities. In the 'missing' 66 seconds you hear them live, in the studio, working together to close what indeed was something of an epic performance. And it's not just the musicians who have greater confidence. The recording itself is more accomplished, better balanced. However effective the echoey ambiance of, for example, “Mouhamadou Bamba” was on the first album, you don't find the same tricks here. They're not needed. Instead the core unit of bass, drums and guitar, ably abetted by more percussion, a second guitar and on-the-button horns, provide a solid foundation from which the five vocalists and featured instrumentalists can launch and then soar. creditsreleased November 20, 2020

28,90 €*