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Sunburst - Ave Africa (DOLP)
180g vinyl, incl. bonus CD's, Collection of recordings from one of Tanzania’s most revered but short-lived bands of the 1970s, Sunburst. Covering their entire output from 1973 to 1976, this first retrospective features music from their 45 RPM singles on Moto Moto and TFC label, as well as their sole album, "Ave Africa", and an unreleased radio session recorded in Tanzania in 1973. This release comprises of the double vinyl and a copy of the CD version, which contains extra tracks.

26,90 €*
VA - Saboo! Va Va Voom! Vol.III (LP)
16 Early 60's Instrumental Shakers

15,90 €*
VA - Jambú E Os Míticos Sons Da Amazônia (DOLP)
The city of Belém, in the Northern state of Pará in Brazil, has long been a hotbed of culture and musical innovation. Enveloped by the mystical wonder of the Amazonian forest and overlooking the vastness of the Atlantic Ocean, Belém consists of a diverse culture as vibrant and broad as the Amazon itself. Amerindians, Europeans, Africans - and the myriad combinations between these people - would mingle, and ingeniously pioneer musical genres such as Carimbó, Samba-De-Cacete, Siriá, Bois-Bumbás and bambiá. Although left in the margins of history, these exotic and mysteriously different sounds would thrive in a parallel universe of their own. I didn’t even know of the existence of that universe until an Australian DJ and producer by the name of Carlo Xavier dragged me deep into this whole new musical world. Ant it all began in Belém do Pará. Perched on a peninsula between the Bay of Guajará and the Guamá river, sculpted by water into ports, small deltas and peripheral areas, Belém had connected city dwellers with those deeper within the forest providing fertile ground for the development of a popular culture mirroring the mighty waters surrounding it. Through the continuous flow of culture, language and tradition, various rhythms were gathered here and transformed into new musical forms that were simultaneously traditional and modern. Historically marginalized African religions like Umbanda, Candomblé and the Tambor de Mina, which had reached this side of the Atlantic through slaves from West Africa – especially from the Kingdom of Dahomey, currently the Republic of Benin – left an indelible stamp on the identity of Pará´s music. They would give birth to Lundun, Banguê and Carimbó, styles later modernised by Verequete, Orlando Pereira, Mestre Cupijó and Pinduca to great effect. The success of these pioneers would create a solid foundation for a myriad of modern bands in urban areas. Known as the “Caribbean Port,” Belem had been receiving signal from radio stations from Colombia, Surinam, Guyana and the Caribbean islands - notably Cuba and the Dominican republic - since the 1940s. By the early 1960s, Disc jockeys breathlessly exchanged Caribbean records to add these frenetic, island sounds to liven up revelers. The competition was fierce as to who would be the first to bring unheard hits from these countries. The craze eventually reached local bands’ repertoires, and Belém’s suburbs got overtaken by merengue, leading to the creation of modern sounds such as Lambada and Guitarrada. To reach a larger audience, the music needed to be broadcast. Radios began targeting the taste of mainstream audiences and played music known as “music for masses.” As the demand for this music grew, it led to the establishment of recording companies. Belém’s infant recording industry began when Rauland Belém Som Ltd was founded in the 1970s. It boosted a radio station, a recording studio, a music label and had a deep roster of popular artists across the carimbó, siriá, bolero and Brega genres. Another important aspect in understanding how the musical tradition spread in Belém, are the aparelhagem sonora: the sound system culture of Pará. Beginning as simple gramophones connected to loudspeakers tied to light posts or trees, these sound systems livened up neighbourhood parties and family gatherings. The equipment evolved from amateur models into sophisticated versions, perfected over time through the wisdom of handymen. Today’s aparelhagens draw immense crowds, packing clubs with thousands of revelers in Belém’s peripheral neighbourhoods or inland towns in Pará. The history of "Jambú e Os Míticos Sons Da Amazônia" is the history of an entire city in its full glory. With bustling night clubs providing the best sound systems and erotic live shows, gossip about the whereabouts of legendary bands, singers turned into movie stars, supreme craftiness, and the creativity of a class of musicians that didn’t hesitate to take a gamble, Jambú is an exhilarating, cinematic ride into the beauty and heart of what makes Pará’s little corner of the Amazon tick. The hip swaying, frantic percussion and big band brass of the mixture of carimbó with siriá, the mystical melodies of Amazonian drums, the hypnotizing cadence of the choirs, and the deep, musical reverence to Afro-Brazilian religions, provided the soundtrack for sweltering nights in the city’s club district. The music and tales found in Jambú are stories of resilience, triumph against all odds, and, most importantly, of a city in the borders of the Amazon who has always known how to throw a damn good party. “Jambú is a plant widely used in Amazonian and Paraense cuisine. Known for having an appetitestimulating effect, it is added to various dishes and salads but is most famously one of the main ingredients in Tucupi and Tacacá, two delicacies that have been immortalized in countless Carimbó songs. Chewing the leaves of the Jambú plant will leave a strong sensation of tingling on the tongue and lips. Indigenous communities have relied upon its anaesthetic qualities for centuries as an effective remedy against toothaches and as a cure for mouth and throat infections. A decade ago, a distillery from Belém discovered the euphoric effects of the Jambú plant when combined with distilled sugarcane based spirit - known as cachaça - and created the now legendary “Cachaça de Jambú“.Die Stadt Belém im nördlichen Bundesstaat Pará in Brasilien ist seit langem eine Brutstätte für Kultur und musikalische Innovation. Umgeben von dem mystischen Wunder des Amazonaswaldes und mit Blick auf die Weite des Atlantiks, besteht Belém aus einer vielfältigen Kultur, die so lebendig und breit ist wie der Amazonas selbst. Amerindianer, Europäer, Afrikaner - und die unzähligen Kombinationen zwischen diesen Menschen - würden sich vermischen und genial musikalische Genres wie Carimbó, Samba-De-Cacete, Siriá, Bois-Bumbás und Bambiá einführen. Obwohl am Rande der Geschichte stehen geblieben, würden diese exotischen und geheimnisvoll unterschiedlichen Klänge in einem eigenen Paralleluniversum gedeihen.

33,90 €*
Nigeria Fuji Machine - Synchro Sound System & Power (LP)
Heavyweight Vinyl, incl. Mp3 Download Code

27,90 €*
Willie Colon Presents Ruben Blades - Metiendo Mano! (LP)
remastered, 180g vinyl

14,90 €*
Ray Barretto - Indestructible (LP)
remastered, 180g vinyl

17,90 €*
VA - Antilles Méchant Bateau (LP)
Die Westindischen Inseln - eine liebliche Küste, die vielen Klischees aus einer anderen Zeit unterliegt. Biguine ist ein rhythmischer Musikstil, der im 19. Jahrhundert in Guadeloupe und Martinique entstand und französische Tanzschritte aus dem 19. Jahrhundert mit afrikanischen Rhythmen verbindet. Gwo Ka ist in allen ethnischen und religiösen Gruppen der guadeloupeanischen Gesellschaft verbreitet. Er verbindet Sprechgesang auf Guadeloupe-Kreolisch, Rhythmen, die auf den Ka-Trommeln gespielt werden, und Tanz.Sie befreien sich von etablierten Formaten und verleihen diesen Liedern eine Musikalität, die sich mit Spiritualität anfüllt. Von infernalischen Kadenzen, die sich an »latin« Rhythmen der Nachbarinseln anlehnen, über Beginen mit perkussivem Tempo bis hin zu ruhigeren - und dennoch düsteren - Balladen führt uns diese Zusammenstellung zurück an die Anfänge und Wiedergeburt, gleichbedeutend mit Erkenntnis.

22,90 €*
VA - Demoitis Vol. 1 (RSD 21) (LP)
Record Store Day 2021 Exclusive On sticker : "Sometimes the demo recording of a song has a vibe that cannot be duplicated. Whether that first recording is a voice memo on your phone or half haphazardly recorded with one mic in the room, there’s an undeniable charm to these recordings. If you spend some time listening to them, when the “real” recording is made, many times one has a hard time letting go of the demo. The medical term for this is called “Demoitis”. On that note, Big Crown Records is proud to present Demoitis Vol.1, a compilation of demos that went on to become album cuts on the label."

27,90 €*
Eddie Palmieri - Vamonos Pa'l Monte (LP)
remastered, 180g vinyl

13,90 €*
VA - Oops! Va Va Voom! Vol.V (LP)
16 Early 60's Instrumental Shakers

15,90 €*
Los Bitchos - Let The Festivities Begin! (LP)
Los Bitchos sind eine internationale Surf/Psychedelic-Instrumentalband, deren Mitglieder aus allen vier Himmelsrichtungen kommen: UK, Australien, Schweden und Südamerika. Ihr Sound bewegt sich irgendwo zwischen peruanischer Chicha, Cumbia, türkischem Psych, Surf-Gitarren und natürlich ein bisschen schwedischem Pop. Serra Petale (Gitarre), Agustina Ruiz (Keytar), Josefine Jonsson (Bass) und Nic Crawshaw (Schlagzeug) haben sich aber auf nächtlichen Hauspartys oder durch Freunde kennen gelernt. Daher kommt auch ihr einzigartiger Sound. Es ist ungefähr so, als wenn ihre spirituellen Cousins Khruangbin - die übrigens auch Fans von Los Bitchos sind – sich eine Nacht im Shacklewell Arms in Dalston mit billigem Mezcal zudröhnen würden.Ihre Instrumentalstücke erinnern an Szenen, in denen man in einen Wüstensaloon stolziert und eine Reihe flammender Sambucas anzündet, mit einer Tarantino-Heldin auf dem Beifahrersitz mitfährt, oder mit all seinen Freunden unter einer riesigen Piñata die Fiesta seines Lebens feiert. Der Opa der Keytaristin ist ein uruguayischer Cowboy, was kann einen also da noch wundern. Ihr Debüt “Let The Festivities Begin!” erschien am 04.02.2022 und wurde von Alex Kapranos (Franz Ferdinand) in den Gallery Studios in London produziert - dem Aufnahmeraum, der Phil Manzanera (Roxy Music) gehört.

25,90 €*
Manu Dibango - Cubafrica (RSD 21) (LP)
Afro-cuban : that term which set the world on fire, from rumba to boléro, mambo to cha-cha-cha, before salsa, that 70's spicy sauce, took over from the others. But to speak truely, since the mists of times (of slavery), both Africa and Cuba aim to vamp that umbilical cord. The most recent example, CubAfrica, a record born from the reunion of a master from Africa and this very living institution from Cuba, during a show around Albi (in the south of France) where they were both headlining in spring 1996. Manu Dibango's sax melted perfectly with the rural music of Eliadès Ochoa and his Cuarteto Patria, here's the beginning of an idea. Talking about latino music, Manu Dibango has an history with it. First, during the early 60's, from Douala to Abidjan and Paris, he was surrounded by as much cuban tempos as afro, and a lot of descarga, this typical afro-cuban jam sessions with a spicy jazzy touch, which were back in the circumstances back in the days. Later on, in the 70’s, invited in Puerto Rico by the Fania All Stars, this dreamy salsa big band at its highest, Manu dressed his anthemic hit "Soul Makossa", for a show (and then a record) of anthology. There was nothing more natural for him than diving again in the cuban bath. This time, he crossed the sound barrier with this Cuarteto Patria, a standard combo in the cuban music, founded 60 years ago and handled by Eliadès Ochoa, this master of très the ancestral cuban guitar, in 1978. He just achieved another magic meeting, the one of Buena Vista Social Club' record, next to Compay Segundo, Ruben Gonzalez and Ry Cooder. In Paris, back from Albi, an idea started to tickle Manu, Eliadès and... Gilbert Castro, boss of Celluloïd-Mélodie. They high fived each other, been agree on the repertoire and then get to Davout studio the day after. They tweak the arrangements right at the studio with the help of Ernesto "Tito" Puentes and Hughes de Courson, Lambarena' producer. In two days, everything's almost ready. Jerry Malekani, Manu's guitar player will add a few things on it. CubAfrica is a seductive guided tour around the garden of latinos' classics, with that Creole' smell. Latinos but not only cuban, this record is a walk toward mexican Cielito lindo or Cerezo Rosa, this french sweet made by André Claveau and spiced by Perez Prado. A repertoire that even newcommers are able to hum, due to such a patrimonial status, spread by Cubans and their African partner in crime, round-shaping sounds for a spontaneous result: the black continent and the Caribbean island aren't on the edge of losing the bond between them.   Manu Dibango (born 1933) is a saxophonist, vibraphonist and pianist from Cameroon. He developed his own musical style by combining jazz with traditional Cameroonian music and the popular Cameroonian dance music Makossa.He was born in Douala. Like his father, he belongs to the Yabassi ethnic group, while his mother was a Duala. As a student, he discovered jazz for himself in Chartres during the 1950s and learned to play the piano. In Reims, where he was preparing for his baccalauréat, he took up the saxophone and began performing in nightclubs, to the great chagrin of his father, who subsequently cut off his alimony in 1956.Various contracts took him to Brussels, where he met Coco, his wife, to Antwerp and Charleroi. During this time, his jazz style became "Africanized" through contact with the Congolese milieu that emerged in Belgium as a result of immigration from Zaire before and after its independence in 1960. Joseph Kabasélé hired him for his orchestra Le Grand Kallé et l'African Jazz and recorded numerous records with him, which had great success in Africa and took them to Léopoldville, where Manu popularized the twist in 1962. Returning to Cameroon, on the other hand, proved difficult and Manu Dibango went to France again.He had engagements with Dick Rivers and Nino Ferrer, big names of the time, but it was only after 1969 that he was able to continue his African successes with recordings of his own compositions.In 1972 he conquered the charts in the United States with Soul Makossa (actually the B-side of the single Mouvement Ewondo). It was the first number-one hit by an African musician in the U.S., prompting Dibango to embark on his first tour, where he made numerous contacts with black musicians in the country. Inspired by African tribal music and contrasted with European church sounds, animated by jazz and soul from America, he succeeded with the album in the opinion of the London magazine City Limits in creating "smooth, impactful dance club music with catchy saxophone dressing." He fused traditional Cameroonian rhythms, Nigerian highlife pop, Congolese folk, Latin American cha-cha-cha and funk, reggae, hip-hop and bebop jazz sounds.Soul Makossa also brought the Makossa style of music to prominence outside of Cameroon. The song is also considered by some to have paved the way for the emergence of disco music. The refrain, "mama-se, mama-sa, ma-ma-ko-ssa," was used by Michael Jackson in his 1982 song Wanna Be Startin' Somethin', and in 2006 in Rihanna's equally hugely successful song Don't Stop the Music; Manu Dibango has filed copyright lawsuits against both singers. The song was also sampled on Wyclef Jean's 1997 album The Carnival.This launched a career that made him famous worldwide. In particular, the boom of world music in the 1990s boosted his popularity and took him on numerous tours.Manu Dibango has worked with numerous musicians throughout his career, including Fela Kuti, Herbie Hancock, Bill Laswell, Bernie Worrell, Youssou N'Dour and reggae musicians Sly & Robbi   Cuarteto Patría is one of the leading musical groups in Santiago de Cuba. It was founded in 1939 by Francisco Cobas la O (Pancho Cobas), director, with Emilia Gracia, Rigoberto Hechaverría (Maduro) and Rey Caney (Reinaldo Hierrezuelo la O). The original style was traditional trova, with boleros and some música campesina (countryside music). In due course, the members and the music changed. By far the greatest change was the arrival of Eliades Ochoa, who has proved to be an inspired choice.Ochoa was invited by Cobas to become leader in 1978, and, before accepting, he got agreement to introduce new musical works into the repertoire. At that time Cobas continued with the group, and Hilario Cuadras and Amado Machado joined. Ochoa introduced the son as the staple diet of the group, and beefed up the percussion to balance the guajiro content with an African element. Even more important was his personal qualities. He is a truly outstanding acoustic guitarist, with a warm singing style. For all that, it took a long time for music lovers outside Cuba to hear about the group. In the series of albums Ochoa played an increasingly prominent part, and this was reflected in increased sales for the Cuarteto Patría albums, and in many foreign tours for the man and his group.

36,90 €*
VA - Brazil Classics 1, 2, 3 3x(LP)Box
Limited edition colored vinyl, three LP box set, with new notes from David Byrne—celebrating the 30 year anniversary of the release of Byrne's seminal collection of some of the most important artists in Brazilian Music. A ground breaking series of albums when first issued, they sold over half a million copies and turned so many people on to amazing music—from a country where people didn't sing in English. In a way the first “world" compilation, the very first Luaka Bop release and a killer set of albums.

39,90 €*