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Fela Kuti & Africa70 - Expensive Shit (LP)
Fela Kuti - Tenorsaxophon, Altsaxophon, Klavier, Gesang, Arrangement, Komponist, Produzent Der Titel des Albums und der erste Track beziehen sich auf einen Vorfall im Jahr 1974. Die nigerianische Polizei hatte Kuti einen Joint untergeschoben. Bevor er verhaftet wurde, aß er den Joint, aber die Polizei brachte ihn in Gewahrsam und wartete darauf, dass er die (titelgebenden) Exkremente produzierte. Der Legende nach gelang es ihm, den Kot eines anderen Häftlings zu verwenden, und er wurde schließlich freigelassen. Das zweite Stück ist von einem Sprichwort der Yoruba über die Kraft der Natur und des Universums inspiriert. In den frühen siebziger Jahren lebte Fela Kuti in der Kalakuta Republic in Nigeria, einem Anwesen, in dem auch seine Familie, seine Bandkollegen und ein Aufnahmestudio untergebracht waren. Aufgrund von Kutis lautstarken antimilitaristischen Ansichten sah die Polizei ihn und sein Anwesen als politische und soziale Bedrohung an und verhaftete Kuti häufig und durchsuchte das Anwesen. In seiner Rezension der 2000er Expensive Shit schrieb Pitchfork: "Es ist allzu leicht, sich in Kutis Diskografie zu verfangen. Beginnen Sie mit Expensive Shit und verpassen Sie nicht den weiteren Weg". Nick Reynolds von BBC Music nannte es eine "klassische Afrobeat-Neuauflage" und sagte, der Titelsong sei "sarkastisch, urkomisch und rechtschaffen wütend [während] 'Water No Get Enemy' mit einem großartigen, lateinamerikanisch angehauchten Saxophon-Refrain-Riff noch besser ist." Es wurde auf Platz 78 der "Top 100 Albums of the 1970s" Liste von Pitchfork eingestuft. Im Jahr 2020 wurde Expensive Shit vom Rolling Stone in der Liste "The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time" auf Platz 402 eingestuft Quelle: Wikipedia

19,90 €*
Robert Y Su Banda - Soy La Ley (LP)
"Released in 1978, “Soy la ley” by Robert y su Banda is an obscure but sought-after slab of Colombian salsa dura with the special distinction of having the “original” version of Álvaro José “Joe” Arroyo’s monster hit ‘Rebelión’ hidden in plain sight on the second side of the record. The band’s leader, Roberto Antonio Urquijo Fonseca, is still active today and, hailing from Barranquilla, Colombia, is as steeped in the costeño sound of cumbia as he is in salsa. Roberto certainly has a perfect voice for salsa, bringing to mind that of the Boricua super star sonero Héctor Lavoe. In fact, Roberto y su Banda are well remembered by salsa fanatics in Medellín because they were the other act (along with Piper Pimienta and his orchestra) that opened the first Colombian performance of Héctor Lavoe, on the afternoon of July 29, 1978 at the Plaza de Toros La Macarena. Roberto was also one of the vocalists and co-founders (with Hernando Barbosa) of the short-lived La Bandita, where he was known as “Urquijo” and had a big hit with ‘Libre soy’ in 1979. Prior to that, Roberto replaced Juan Piña in Los Hermanos Martelo in 1975 and later joined Grupo Raíces in the 1980s for a couple of albums. He also became a vocalist with Grupo Niche when Alfonso “Moncho” Santana quit, though he left without appearing on any Niche releases. On this album the previously mentioned ‘Rebelión’ of Joe Arroyo kicks off side two but bears the completely different title ‘El Mulato’ and is credited to Adela Martelo de Arroyo, Joe Arroyo’s wife at the time (Arroyo was signed exclusively to Discos Fuentes). The arrangement, by Enrique Aguilar, is also quite different from ‘Rebelión’ with an introduction that sounds inspired by Tite Curet Alonso’s composition ‘Plantación adentro’ (from “Willie Colon Presents Rubén Blades Metiendo Mano!”, 1977) but it contains all the elements of Joe’s later global smash with the exception of being rhythmically more of a cumbia than a salsa. At the time it was not promoted by Zeida as a hit, with only one 45 single being released from the album, featuring two songs by Colombian composers, ‘Hijo de gitana’ (a bouncy cumbia by Juvenal Viloria) and a smoking salsa version of Joaquín Bedoya’s ‘Déjala que se vaya’. Arroyo is said to have presented ‘El mulato’ to Fruko (his bandleader at the time), and it was recorded but was shelved due to a vocal take that Fruko deemed sub-par. When Arroyo left Fruko y sus Tesos and formed his own band, La Verdad, producer Isaac Villanueva looked through the Fuentes archives for material and stumbled on the original Fruko recording. Arroyo decided to re-record the whole song, changing the intro (to avoid any legal issues with Curet Alonso) and the title to clarify the main theme: the injustice of slavery and black resistance to it. And so, with Michi Sarmiento’s brilliant arrangement plus La Verdad’s modern reinterpretation of the nearly decade old tune, ‘Rebelión’ became a mega-hit even in Asia and Africa and Arroyo’s fame shot around the world and made him the international legend he remains to this day, eight years after his untimely demise. Besides the aforementioned ‘El mulato’, the title track ‘Soy la ley’ is a dance floor burner and comes from the pen of Joe Arroyo as well, as does ‘Mi cariño no espera’, which is another cumbia/salsa hybrid. To these ears, one of the voices singing coro (chorus) on the album sounds a lot like Joe Arroyo, who was Roberto’s friend from back in the early 70s when Arroyo sang with Colombia’s La Protesta. Aside from the Arroyo originals, there is the super hot guaguancó ‘Son Candela’ by the venerable Cuban singer/composer Joseíto Fernández, the guajira son ‘En la inmensa soledad’, made famous by Los Compadres, the upbeat sounding lament ‘Preso sin sentencia’, originally by Puerto Rican plenero and percussionist Rafael Ortiz Escuté (aka Joe Pappy), plus an absolutely burning version of Mexican crooner Armando Manzanero’s 1967 hit ‘Aquel señor’. The record is rounded out by the salsa tune ‘Si ella pregunta por mí’, which was covered in 1980 by Orquesta Borinquen."

19,90 €*
VA - Antilles Méchant Bateau (LP)
Die Westindischen Inseln - eine liebliche Küste, die vielen Klischees aus einer anderen Zeit unterliegt. Biguine ist ein rhythmischer Musikstil, der im 19. Jahrhundert in Guadeloupe und Martinique entstand und französische Tanzschritte aus dem 19. Jahrhundert mit afrikanischen Rhythmen verbindet. Gwo Ka ist in allen ethnischen und religiösen Gruppen der guadeloupeanischen Gesellschaft verbreitet. Er verbindet Sprechgesang auf Guadeloupe-Kreolisch, Rhythmen, die auf den Ka-Trommeln gespielt werden, und Tanz.Sie befreien sich von etablierten Formaten und verleihen diesen Liedern eine Musikalität, die sich mit Spiritualität anfüllt. Von infernalischen Kadenzen, die sich an »latin« Rhythmen der Nachbarinseln anlehnen, über Beginen mit perkussivem Tempo bis hin zu ruhigeren - und dennoch düsteren - Balladen führt uns diese Zusammenstellung zurück an die Anfänge und Wiedergeburt, gleichbedeutend mit Erkenntnis.

22,90 €*
Sharhabil Ahmed - The King Of Sudanese Jazz (LP)
We're super happy to announce the release by Sharhabil Ahmed, the actual King of Sudanese Jazz (he actually won that title in a competition in the early 1970s). Sonically it sounds very different from what Jazz is understood to sound like outside of Sudan. It’s an incredible unique mix of rock’n’roll, funk, surf, traditional sudanese music and influences from Congolese sounds. Original copies of Sharhabil recordings are often hard to find, so we’re happy they will now be widely available. Sharhabil was born in 1935 and he is the founding father of the Sudanese Jazz scene. His aim was to modernize Sudanese music by bringing it together with western influences and instrumentation like he summarized it himself in a 2004 interview for „Al Ahram Weekly“: “[...]Haqiba music, you know, was traditional vocal music with little accompaniment beyond a tambourine. When our generation came in the 1960s, we came with a new style. It was a time of worldwide revolution in music. In Europe, the rhythms of swing and tango were being replaced by jazz, samba, rock- and-roll. We were influenced by this rejuvenation in Sudan, too. I started out by learning to play the oud and traditional Sudanese music, and got a diploma from the music institute of Khartoum University. But my ambition was to develop something new. For this, the guitar seemed like the best instrument. Western instruments can approximate the scales of Sudanese music very well. After all, a lot of Western music is originally from Africa. I have absorbed different influences, from traditional Sudanese rhythms to calypso and jazz, and I hold them together in my music with no difficulty.” Referring to its sonic apperance, Sudanese Jazz hasn’t too much in common with the western idea of Jazz. Sharhabil’s sound feels more like a unique combination of surf, rock n roll, funk, Congolese music and East African harmonies a.o. So it kind of made sense to me, while visiting him in Sudan, to see the records he kept over the years: 2 of his own and 2 by Mulatu Astatke signed to him, further proving the influence of Ethiopian and other neighboring countries. In fact, Sharhabil was not just one of many Sudanese Jazz artist. He is a king of Jazz, literally, since in he won a competion over other artists for that title.

22,90 €*
Alhaji (Chief) Prof. Kollington Ayinla And His Fuji '78 Organisation - Blessing (LP)
Limited edition of 1000 copies in exact replica

23,90 €*
VA - African Scream Contest 2 (DOLP)
A great compilation can open the gate to another world. Who knew that some of the most exciting Afro-funk records of all time were actually made in the small West African country of Benin? Once Analog Africa released the first African Scream Contest in 2008, the proof was there for all to hear; gut-busting yelps, lethally well- drilled horn sections and irresistibly insistent rhythms added up to a record that took you into its own space with the same electrifying sureness as any favourite blues or soul or funk or punk sampler you might care to mention. Like every other Analog Africa release, African Scream Contest II is illuminated by meticulously researched text and effortlessly fashion-forward photography supplied by the artists themselves. 2LP deluxe gatefold LP with 24-pages LP size booklet, also includes unlimited streaming of African Scream Contest Vol.2 - Benin 1963-1980 via the free Bandcamp app, plus high-quality download in MP3, FLAC and more

34,90 €*
Baobab Gouye-Gui De Dakar ‎- Viva Bawobab S1-Si Bou Odja (LP)
In the same year, 1981, that Orchestra Baobab recorded their second album under the direction of budding young Senegalese producer, Ibrahima Sylla, the Japanese electronics company Sony, held a press conference in Vienna to announce their version of the Compact Disc. In attendance was Herbert von Karajan, conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic and the urban myth – albeit possibly true – that the maximum length of 74 minutes of music then available for a CD, was because this allowed the entire length of Karajan's recording of Beethoven's 9 th Symphony, to fit on one disc.Fast forward 12 years to London in 1993 and Sterns' release of Baobab's 'Bamba' CD which combined tracks from the two vinyl albums 'Mouhamadou Bamba' & 'Viva Bawobab S1/ Si Bou Odja', and Sterns had a problem. What tracks to keep, what to drop and once you'd decided that, how to fit them all onto a CD in under 74 minutes? The solution was to edit, primarily by fading early, one of the longest tracks of the selection.Accordingly the first track of this album, “Sibou Odia”, was reduced from 14'35” to 13'41” and, in most cases, none were the wiser as the suggestion to call the CD version an “Edit” had been dropped on the basis that nobody would believe a 13+ minutes track was an edit! Now of course, such restrictions don't exist and either via a repiication of its original format on vinyl, or through the digital medium, you can hear the full-length version as first intended.And it's fascinating, not just this track but the whole album. The band is young, energetic and confident of their abilities. In the 'missing' 66 seconds you hear them live, in the studio, working together to close what indeed was something of an epic performance. And it's not just the musicians who have greater confidence. The recording itself is more accomplished, better balanced. However effective the echoey ambiance of, for example, “Mouhamadou Bamba” was on the first album, you don't find the same tricks here. They're not needed. Instead the core unit of bass, drums and guitar, ably abetted by more percussion, a second guitar and on-the-button horns, provide a solid foundation from which the five vocalists and featured instrumentalists can launch and then soar. creditsreleased November 20, 2020

28,90 €*
VA - Praise Poems Volume 8 (DOLP)
After 7 releases in 6 years, the Tramp Records crew invites you to another illuminating journey into the soulful jazz, folk and funk of the 1970s. This 8th edition contains eighteen jazz, soul and folk nuggets from the period between the late 1960s and the late 1970s. One of the many highlights is the opening Bobby Cole track, which is most likely one of the finest independently produced vocal jazz recordings ever pressed on wax. So true. Oscar Brown Jr. and Mark Murphy send their regards. But that's just the beginning. Praise Poems Vol.8 covers a wide range of genres, from big band jazz (Helmut Pistor's Big Rock Jazz Band and Germany's Ladykiller) to psych-pop (Portraits in Sound, Harve and Charee and Allison & Shaffer), from folk-rock (Flash, Garndarf and the incredible Fang Buzbee) to AOR (The Menagerie and Penn Central), and rounds out the set with a handful of melancholic folk beauties, most notably Hans Hass Jr's stunning "What Colour is the Wind". Very few compilation series make it to eight volumes, and those that do often run out of quality music or stray too far from their original artistic direction. This is certainly not the case with the Praise Poems series, as our team of compilers and researchers continue the search for lost and often overlooked music from a bygone era. Many of these records were released in small quantities as private pressings or by small regional labels. Obviously, these labels had neither the budget nor the know-how or the means to promote their releases extensively. As a result, most of these artists failed to reach the wide audience that their music so richly deserved.

26,90 €*
Manu Dibango - Afrovision (LP)
Reissue des 1976er Albums von Manu Dibango, bekannt für seinen Jazz-Funk-Afro-Klassiker Soul Makossa. Afrovision gilt mit seiner groovy Fusion aus Afrobeat, Funk und Jazz als Dibangos Beitrag zur Disco-Welle. Limited edition, remastered, repress, red vinyl(?)

27,90 €*
Bobby Womack - The Collection (DOLP)
Re-Release der Original-Alben: 1 Fly Me To The Moon (1968) 2 My Prescription (1969) 3 The Womack "Live" (1970) 4 Communication (1971) 5 Understanding (1972) 6 Across 110th Street (1972) 7 Facts Of Life (1973) 8 Lookin' For A Love Again (1974) 9 I Don't Know What The World Is Coming To (1975) 10 Safety Zone (1975) 11 B.W. Goes C. And W. (1976) 12 Home Is Where The Heart Is (1976)

119,90 €*
VA - APALA: Apala Groups In Nigeria 1967-70 (DOLP)
First time collection of Apala music released outside of Nigeria. Includes tracks in related styles, such as Waka, Sakara, Pakeke and Yoruba.

29,90 €*
Manu Dibango - Cubafrica (RSD 21) (LP)
Afro-cuban : that term which set the world on fire, from rumba to boléro, mambo to cha-cha-cha, before salsa, that 70's spicy sauce, took over from the others. But to speak truely, since the mists of times (of slavery), both Africa and Cuba aim to vamp that umbilical cord. The most recent example, CubAfrica, a record born from the reunion of a master from Africa and this very living institution from Cuba, during a show around Albi (in the south of France) where they were both headlining in spring 1996. Manu Dibango's sax melted perfectly with the rural music of Eliadès Ochoa and his Cuarteto Patria, here's the beginning of an idea. Talking about latino music, Manu Dibango has an history with it. First, during the early 60's, from Douala to Abidjan and Paris, he was surrounded by as much cuban tempos as afro, and a lot of descarga, this typical afro-cuban jam sessions with a spicy jazzy touch, which were back in the circumstances back in the days. Later on, in the 70’s, invited in Puerto Rico by the Fania All Stars, this dreamy salsa big band at its highest, Manu dressed his anthemic hit "Soul Makossa", for a show (and then a record) of anthology. There was nothing more natural for him than diving again in the cuban bath. This time, he crossed the sound barrier with this Cuarteto Patria, a standard combo in the cuban music, founded 60 years ago and handled by Eliadès Ochoa, this master of très the ancestral cuban guitar, in 1978. He just achieved another magic meeting, the one of Buena Vista Social Club' record, next to Compay Segundo, Ruben Gonzalez and Ry Cooder. In Paris, back from Albi, an idea started to tickle Manu, Eliadès and... Gilbert Castro, boss of Celluloïd-Mélodie. They high fived each other, been agree on the repertoire and then get to Davout studio the day after. They tweak the arrangements right at the studio with the help of Ernesto "Tito" Puentes and Hughes de Courson, Lambarena' producer. In two days, everything's almost ready. Jerry Malekani, Manu's guitar player will add a few things on it. CubAfrica is a seductive guided tour around the garden of latinos' classics, with that Creole' smell. Latinos but not only cuban, this record is a walk toward mexican Cielito lindo or Cerezo Rosa, this french sweet made by André Claveau and spiced by Perez Prado. A repertoire that even newcommers are able to hum, due to such a patrimonial status, spread by Cubans and their African partner in crime, round-shaping sounds for a spontaneous result: the black continent and the Caribbean island aren't on the edge of losing the bond between them.   Manu Dibango (born 1933) is a saxophonist, vibraphonist and pianist from Cameroon. He developed his own musical style by combining jazz with traditional Cameroonian music and the popular Cameroonian dance music Makossa.He was born in Douala. Like his father, he belongs to the Yabassi ethnic group, while his mother was a Duala. As a student, he discovered jazz for himself in Chartres during the 1950s and learned to play the piano. In Reims, where he was preparing for his baccalauréat, he took up the saxophone and began performing in nightclubs, to the great chagrin of his father, who subsequently cut off his alimony in 1956.Various contracts took him to Brussels, where he met Coco, his wife, to Antwerp and Charleroi. During this time, his jazz style became "Africanized" through contact with the Congolese milieu that emerged in Belgium as a result of immigration from Zaire before and after its independence in 1960. Joseph Kabasélé hired him for his orchestra Le Grand Kallé et l'African Jazz and recorded numerous records with him, which had great success in Africa and took them to Léopoldville, where Manu popularized the twist in 1962. Returning to Cameroon, on the other hand, proved difficult and Manu Dibango went to France again.He had engagements with Dick Rivers and Nino Ferrer, big names of the time, but it was only after 1969 that he was able to continue his African successes with recordings of his own compositions.In 1972 he conquered the charts in the United States with Soul Makossa (actually the B-side of the single Mouvement Ewondo). It was the first number-one hit by an African musician in the U.S., prompting Dibango to embark on his first tour, where he made numerous contacts with black musicians in the country. Inspired by African tribal music and contrasted with European church sounds, animated by jazz and soul from America, he succeeded with the album in the opinion of the London magazine City Limits in creating "smooth, impactful dance club music with catchy saxophone dressing." He fused traditional Cameroonian rhythms, Nigerian highlife pop, Congolese folk, Latin American cha-cha-cha and funk, reggae, hip-hop and bebop jazz sounds.Soul Makossa also brought the Makossa style of music to prominence outside of Cameroon. The song is also considered by some to have paved the way for the emergence of disco music. The refrain, "mama-se, mama-sa, ma-ma-ko-ssa," was used by Michael Jackson in his 1982 song Wanna Be Startin' Somethin', and in 2006 in Rihanna's equally hugely successful song Don't Stop the Music; Manu Dibango has filed copyright lawsuits against both singers. The song was also sampled on Wyclef Jean's 1997 album The Carnival.This launched a career that made him famous worldwide. In particular, the boom of world music in the 1990s boosted his popularity and took him on numerous tours.Manu Dibango has worked with numerous musicians throughout his career, including Fela Kuti, Herbie Hancock, Bill Laswell, Bernie Worrell, Youssou N'Dour and reggae musicians Sly & Robbi   Cuarteto Patría is one of the leading musical groups in Santiago de Cuba. It was founded in 1939 by Francisco Cobas la O (Pancho Cobas), director, with Emilia Gracia, Rigoberto Hechaverría (Maduro) and Rey Caney (Reinaldo Hierrezuelo la O). The original style was traditional trova, with boleros and some música campesina (countryside music). In due course, the members and the music changed. By far the greatest change was the arrival of Eliades Ochoa, who has proved to be an inspired choice.Ochoa was invited by Cobas to become leader in 1978, and, before accepting, he got agreement to introduce new musical works into the repertoire. At that time Cobas continued with the group, and Hilario Cuadras and Amado Machado joined. Ochoa introduced the son as the staple diet of the group, and beefed up the percussion to balance the guajiro content with an African element. Even more important was his personal qualities. He is a truly outstanding acoustic guitarist, with a warm singing style. For all that, it took a long time for music lovers outside Cuba to hear about the group. In the series of albums Ochoa played an increasingly prominent part, and this was reflected in increased sales for the Cuarteto Patría albums, and in many foreign tours for the man and his group.

36,90 €*
Amanaz - Africa (LP)
Dry mix only single LP edition, reverb mix of 2LP edition excluded. Issued in 1975, this is the articulation of Zambia’s Zamrock ethos. Its' musicians were anti-colonial freedom fighters, it envelops Zambian folk music traditions, and it rocks - hard. Amanaz were serious, and they made a serious stab at an album. They titled their album Africa, according to original band member Keith Kabwe, “because of how it was shared and how its inhabitants were butchered and enslaved, its resources stolen... all the atrocities slave drivers committed. “ Thus, their “Kale,” a blues sung in Nyanja, that traced the continent’s arc from slavery to Zambia’s independence closes the album. Kabwe and rhythm guitarist John Kanyepa have a winsome softness to their vocals, which sit politely aside the feral growl of drummer Watson Baldwin Lungu, bassist Jerry Mausala and bandleader/lead guitarist Isaac Mpofu. Africa’s vibe ranges from anxious (“Amanaz”) to escapist (“Easy Street”) to straight-up pissed-off. On the “History of Man,” his voice whiskey-burned, his distorted guitar buzzing like swarming hornets, Mpofu indicts his species. There’s a darkness to Africa not found on any other Zamrock records, and a melancholy drifts throughout, specifically on Mpofu’s more restrained “Khala My Friend,” which stands as an effective, bleak situation for the Zambian everyman, the average citizen of a struggling, new nation, who might have had relatives in conflict-torn countries on the horizon, who might have been struggling to find his next meal, who might have seen a bleaker future than his president promised. Then there’s the clear Velvet Underground-influence on the nostalgic “Sunday Morning,” which, as Kabwe recalls, was the first song written for the album, back in 1968, when Velvet Undergound and Nico was a new release - and the underground funk of “Making The Scene.” The album also tackles traditional Zambian music and early-‘60s rock – punctuated, of course by Kanyepa’s wah-wah and Mpofu’s fuzz guitars. But every time Amanaz get too deep, too violent, they come back with an accessible song and woo their listener back to the groove. “Green Apple” is a civil song, featuring Kanyepa’s sighing guitar.

29,90 €*
VA - Essiebons Special 1973 - 1984 (LP)
Dick Essilfie-Bondzie was all ready for his 90th birthday party when the Covid pandemic hit. The legendary producer, businessman and founder of Ghana’s mighty Essiebons label had invited all his family and friends to the event and it was the disappointment at having to postpone that prompted Analog Africa founder Samy Ben Redjeb to propose a new compilation celebrating his contributions to the world of West African music. For most of the 1970s Essilfie-Bondzie’s Dix and Essiebons labels were synonymous with the best in modern highlife, and his roster was a who’s-who of highlife legends. C.K. Mann, Gyedu Blay Ambolley, Kofi Papa Yankson, Ernest Honny, Rob ‘Roy’ Raindorf and Ebo Taylor all released some of their greatest music under the Essiebons banner. Yet Essilfie-Bondzie had been destined for a very different career. Born in Apam and raised in Accra, he was sent to business school in London at the age of 20, and returned to the security of a government job in Ghana. But his passion for music, inspired by the sounds of Accra’s highlife scene, had never left him, and in 1967 he figured out a way of combining music and business by opening West Africa’s first record pressing plant. The venture, a partnership with the Philips label, was a huge success, attracting business from all over the continent. By the early 1970s Essilfie-Bondzie had left his government job to concentrate on his labels, and by the mid-seventies he was on a hot streak injecting album after album of restless highlife into the bloodstream of the Ghanaian music scene. Essiebons Special features a selection of obscure workouts from some of the label’s heaviest hitters. But in the course of digitising his vast archive of master tapes, Essilfie-Bondzie found a number of Afrobeat and Instrumental maszterpieces tracks from the label’s mid-70s golden age that, for one reason or another, had never been released. Those songs are included here for the first time. Sadly Essilfie-Bondzie passed away before the compilation was finished. But his legacy lives on in the extraordinary music that he gave to the world in his lifetime. Download for LP from Bandcamp also includes unlimited streaming of *Essiebons Special 1973 - 1984 - Ghana Music Power House* via the free Bandcamp app along with high-quality download in MP3, FLAC and more Double LP pressed on 140g virgin vinyl comes with a full color 12-pages booklet

34,90 €*
Rokia Koné & Jacknife Lee - Bamanan (DOLP)
A voice pure, clear and true, floating above bass, synthesizer, traditional percussion and infectious Mande guitar grooves: in Mali, West Africa, everyone knows Rokia Koné, the "Rose of Bamako". On her international debut album, she has teamed up with Grammy award-winning producer Jacknife Lee for a groundbreaking reinterpretation of the Malian sound. While she was one of the 10 powerful vocalists in the West African supergroup Les Amazones d’Afrique, you could be forgiven for not being familiar with the work of Malian singer Rokia Koné. Being in a group helmed by the legendary Angelique Kidjo can do that. But for anyone who heard her stellar showcases on that supergroup’s first two albums, it’s welcome news to learn that the “Rose of Bamako” had finally stepped out on her own with her debut album, BAMANAN. That arresting voice—tender one second, lion-like the next—can soar to dizzying highs and growling lows over the span of a single verse. It would have satisfied purists to hear that instrument in as unadorned and traditional a setting as possible. Yet BAMANAN shoots for the stars with a bold mash-up of tradition and technology, thanks to the rather unlikely pairing of Koné with Irish producer Jacknife Lee. Koné may be a newcomer, but Lee has made a career out of working with big, big names, with producer credits for the likes of U2, Taylor Swift, The Killers, and the last two R.E.M. albums. There may be a fear that a mainstream producer like Lee would opt for bombast over nuance and small details, but the synergy between singer and producer is evident throughout, with Lee always deferring to the song. That feat becomes even more incredible when you realize that the creative process occurred across three continents. Koné recorded a few songs in her home of Bamako, but some of that music sat on a hard drive in her booking agent’s home in Portugal during the pandemic, before making its way to Lee’s studio in California. But you wouldn’t know it from the rollercoaster of electronic drums and throbbing bass that powers “Kurunba,” as Koné matches that velocity with total confidence. Alternately purring, chanting, and wailing through all of the track’s contours, she decries the patriarchal customs that diminish women’s roles in her homeland. “Mayougouba” sets Koné’s delivery into a blur of neon synths and club-ready kicks. Fans of Kidjo’s own early ‘90s forays into house music will find plenty to groove to here, but the song is aimed specifically towards the women: ​​“Move, dance/ You’re perfect as you are,” she sings in Bamana. Yet it’s when Lee heightens the hush inherent in Koné’s songs that proves to be the most affecting. Opener “Bi Ye Tulonba Ye” is declarative yet downtempo, full of shimmering vistas surrounding her. The dreamy chords and filtered whorls of “Bambougou N’tji” give every breath of Koné given plenty of space to enchant. And Lee knows when to disappear completely, as on the spare meditation of “N’yanyan.” With only an electric piano to accompany her, Koné recorded the song in one take, right before power in the city went out and a coup d’etat roiled Mali. Her message is clear though: this too will pass.

25,90 €*
VA - O Brother, Where Art Thou? (DOLP)
Limited Edition, Reissue, Blue Vinyl

36,90 €*