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Jeb Loy Nichols - United States Of The Broken Hearted (LP)
IncludesDownload Card Das neue Jeb Loy Nichols-Album besteht aus zwölf düsteren, aber wunderschönen Stücken, bei denen der langjährige Freund und Produzent Adrian Sherwood seinen charakteristischen Dub-Ansatz gegen sorgfältig zurückgenommene Arrangements eintauscht. Akustikgitarre und Jebs Stimme werden umrahmt von subtilen Bläsersätzen, Cello und Perkussion sowie Keyboardbeiträgen von Martin Duffy (Primal Scream, Felt). Politisch aufgeladene Coverversionen ('I Hate The Capitalist System', 'Deportees') stehen neben eher introspektivem Material, darunter einige der besten Songs, die Nichols bisher geschrieben hat. Adrian Sherwood fügt hinzu: 'Dies ist Jebs 'Great American Songbook', er ist im Laufe der Jahre ein großartiger Sänger und Songwriter geworden. Es ist ein wunderschönes Werk, das an unsere gemeinsame Liebe zu dem Miracle-Album erinnert, das ich mit Bim Sherman gemacht habe. Ich bin wirklich stolz auf diese Platte und sie ist ein passender Nachfolger von Long Time Traveller.'

27,90 €*
Tinariwen – Kel Tinariwen (LP)
'Kel Tinariwen' ist eine aufschlussreiche Entdeckung aus den Tinariwen-Archiven, eine MC mit frühen Aufnahmen der legendären Tuareq-Band, die 1992 nur innerhalb ihrer Sahara-Stammesgebiete erschien und jetzt erstmals die offizielle Veröffentlichung erlebt. 'Kel Tinariwen' hat noch nicht den vollen Bandsound entwickelt, mit dem sich Tinariwen international etablierten, und erweitert die reiche Geschichte der Band um eine weitere Epoche. Ihr Markenzeichen sind die hypnotischen Gitarrenlinien und der Call-and-Response-Gesang, die sich zwischen rauen Drum-Machine-Rhythmen und Keyboard-Melodien verweben und fast an eine arabische Version von 80er Synth-Pop erinnern. Es gibt deutliche Parallelen zwischen den Klängen auf diesem Band und der Arbeit, die in den letzten Jahren von Cratedigger-Labels wie Awesome Tapes From Africa, Sahel Sounds und Sublime Frequencies entdeckt wurde.

27,90 €*
VA– Cuba: Music And Revolution (Culture Clash In Havana Cuba: Experiments In Latin Music 1975-85 Vol. 1) 3 x Vinyl (DOLP)
  Cuba: Music and Revolution: Culture Clash in Havana: Experiments in Latin Music 1975-85 Vol. 1 is a new album compiled by Gilles Peterson and Stuart Baker (Soul Jazz Records) that explores the many new styles that emerged in Cuba in the 1970s as Jazz, Funk, Brazilian Tropicalia and even Disco mixed together with Latin and Salsa on the island as Cuban artists experimented with new musical forms created in the unique socialist state. The music on this album features legendary Cuban groups such as Irakere, Los Van Van and Pablo Milanés as well as a host of lesser known artists such as the radical Grupo De Experimentación, Juan Pablo Torres and Algo Nuevo, Grupo Monumental and Orquesta Ritmo Oriental, groups whose names remain largely unknown outside of Cuba owing to the now 60-year old US trade embargo which remains in place today and which prevents trade with Cuba - and thus most Cuban records were only ever available in Cuba or in ex-Soviet Union states. The music on this album reflects the most cutting-edge of Cuban groups that were recording in Cuba in the 1970s and 1980s - who were all searching for a new Cuban identity and new musical forms that reflected both the Afro-Cuban cultural heritage of a nation that gave birth to Latin music - and its new position as a socialist state. Most of the music featured on this album has never been heard outside of Cuba. Cuba: Music and Revolution is the third book that Gilles Peterson and Stuart Baker have collaborated on together and follows on from their two earlier critically acclaimed books, Freedom, Rhythm and Sound (Revolutionary Jazz Music in the 1960s and 1970s) and Bossa Nova and the Rise of Brazilian Music in the 1960s, both of which also had related album releases on Soul Jazz Records. [info sheet from distr.]

43,90 €*
VA – Cuba: Music And Revolution (Culture Clash In Havana Cuba: Experiments In Latin Music 1973-85 Vol. 2) 3 x Vinyl (DOLP)
Cuba: Music and Revolution: Culture Clash in Havana: Experiments in Latin Music 1975-85 Vol. 2 is the new album compiled by Gilles Peterson and Stuart Baker (Soul Jazz Records) that takes off in exactly the same vein as the much-acclaimed Vol. 1 - exploring the many styles that came out of Cuba in the 1970s as Latin and Salsa mixed with heavy doses of Jazz, Funk, and Disco to create some of the most dancefloor-friendly music ever made!Much of the music on this album is featured in the deluxe large format book 'Cuba: Music and Revolution: Original Cover Art of Cuban Music: Record Sleeve Designs of Revolutionary Cuba 1959-90', released by Soul Jazz Books and also compiled by Gilles Peterson and Stuart Baker (Soul Jazz Records), featuring the music and record designs of Cuba, made in the 30-year period following the Cuban Revolution.  

43,90 €*
Orchestre Les Volcans du Benin – Vol. 1 (LP)

26,90 €*
Cochemea – Vol 2: Baca Sewa
Includes code for free MP3 download on a coupon.Limited Edition, Amethyst Color

29,90 €*
Fela Kuti - Fela Box Set 5-curated by Chris Martin & Femi Kuti (LP)
Die Box Set 5 wurde von Felas Sohn, Femi Kuti, und Chris Martin (Coldplay) gemeinsam kuratiert. Das Artwork jedes der einzelnen Alben wurde akribisch und bis ins letzte Detail der jeweiligen Original-Vinyl-Pressung nachempfunden. Das gilt auch für die Vintage Vinyletiketten. Die Box enthält:- 7 Vinyl-LPs- Ein 20-seitiges, farbiges Booklet mit: Einführungen von Chris Martin und Femi Kuti, einem ausführlichen Kommentar zu jedem der sieben Alben von Musikjournalist und Afrobeat-Historiker Chris May; Songtexten; nie zuvor veröffentlichten Fotos von Fela Kuti; sowie Standbildern aus dem Fela-Dokumentarfilm Music Is The Weapon von 1982.- 16x24" Poster, entworfen vom nigerianischen Künstler Lemi Ghariokwu, der kreativen Kraft hinter 29 von Felas Albumcovern. Limitiert auf 4000 Exemplare weltweit.

109,90 €*
Alhaji (Chief) Prof. Kollington Ayinla And His Fuji '78 Organisation - Blessing (LP)
Limited edition of 1000 copies in exact replica

23,90 €*
Manu Dibango - Cubafrica (RSD 21) (LP)
Afro-cuban : that term which set the world on fire, from rumba to boléro, mambo to cha-cha-cha, before salsa, that 70's spicy sauce, took over from the others. But to speak truely, since the mists of times (of slavery), both Africa and Cuba aim to vamp that umbilical cord. The most recent example, CubAfrica, a record born from the reunion of a master from Africa and this very living institution from Cuba, during a show around Albi (in the south of France) where they were both headlining in spring 1996. Manu Dibango's sax melted perfectly with the rural music of Eliadès Ochoa and his Cuarteto Patria, here's the beginning of an idea. Talking about latino music, Manu Dibango has an history with it. First, during the early 60's, from Douala to Abidjan and Paris, he was surrounded by as much cuban tempos as afro, and a lot of descarga, this typical afro-cuban jam sessions with a spicy jazzy touch, which were back in the circumstances back in the days. Later on, in the 70’s, invited in Puerto Rico by the Fania All Stars, this dreamy salsa big band at its highest, Manu dressed his anthemic hit "Soul Makossa", for a show (and then a record) of anthology. There was nothing more natural for him than diving again in the cuban bath. This time, he crossed the sound barrier with this Cuarteto Patria, a standard combo in the cuban music, founded 60 years ago and handled by Eliadès Ochoa, this master of très the ancestral cuban guitar, in 1978. He just achieved another magic meeting, the one of Buena Vista Social Club' record, next to Compay Segundo, Ruben Gonzalez and Ry Cooder. In Paris, back from Albi, an idea started to tickle Manu, Eliadès and... Gilbert Castro, boss of Celluloïd-Mélodie. They high fived each other, been agree on the repertoire and then get to Davout studio the day after. They tweak the arrangements right at the studio with the help of Ernesto "Tito" Puentes and Hughes de Courson, Lambarena' producer. In two days, everything's almost ready. Jerry Malekani, Manu's guitar player will add a few things on it. CubAfrica is a seductive guided tour around the garden of latinos' classics, with that Creole' smell. Latinos but not only cuban, this record is a walk toward mexican Cielito lindo or Cerezo Rosa, this french sweet made by André Claveau and spiced by Perez Prado. A repertoire that even newcommers are able to hum, due to such a patrimonial status, spread by Cubans and their African partner in crime, round-shaping sounds for a spontaneous result: the black continent and the Caribbean island aren't on the edge of losing the bond between them.   Manu Dibango (born 1933) is a saxophonist, vibraphonist and pianist from Cameroon. He developed his own musical style by combining jazz with traditional Cameroonian music and the popular Cameroonian dance music Makossa.He was born in Douala. Like his father, he belongs to the Yabassi ethnic group, while his mother was a Duala. As a student, he discovered jazz for himself in Chartres during the 1950s and learned to play the piano. In Reims, where he was preparing for his baccalauréat, he took up the saxophone and began performing in nightclubs, to the great chagrin of his father, who subsequently cut off his alimony in 1956.Various contracts took him to Brussels, where he met Coco, his wife, to Antwerp and Charleroi. During this time, his jazz style became "Africanized" through contact with the Congolese milieu that emerged in Belgium as a result of immigration from Zaire before and after its independence in 1960. Joseph Kabasélé hired him for his orchestra Le Grand Kallé et l'African Jazz and recorded numerous records with him, which had great success in Africa and took them to Léopoldville, where Manu popularized the twist in 1962. Returning to Cameroon, on the other hand, proved difficult and Manu Dibango went to France again.He had engagements with Dick Rivers and Nino Ferrer, big names of the time, but it was only after 1969 that he was able to continue his African successes with recordings of his own compositions.In 1972 he conquered the charts in the United States with Soul Makossa (actually the B-side of the single Mouvement Ewondo). It was the first number-one hit by an African musician in the U.S., prompting Dibango to embark on his first tour, where he made numerous contacts with black musicians in the country. Inspired by African tribal music and contrasted with European church sounds, animated by jazz and soul from America, he succeeded with the album in the opinion of the London magazine City Limits in creating "smooth, impactful dance club music with catchy saxophone dressing." He fused traditional Cameroonian rhythms, Nigerian highlife pop, Congolese folk, Latin American cha-cha-cha and funk, reggae, hip-hop and bebop jazz sounds.Soul Makossa also brought the Makossa style of music to prominence outside of Cameroon. The song is also considered by some to have paved the way for the emergence of disco music. The refrain, "mama-se, mama-sa, ma-ma-ko-ssa," was used by Michael Jackson in his 1982 song Wanna Be Startin' Somethin', and in 2006 in Rihanna's equally hugely successful song Don't Stop the Music; Manu Dibango has filed copyright lawsuits against both singers. The song was also sampled on Wyclef Jean's 1997 album The Carnival.This launched a career that made him famous worldwide. In particular, the boom of world music in the 1990s boosted his popularity and took him on numerous tours.Manu Dibango has worked with numerous musicians throughout his career, including Fela Kuti, Herbie Hancock, Bill Laswell, Bernie Worrell, Youssou N'Dour and reggae musicians Sly & Robbi   Cuarteto Patría is one of the leading musical groups in Santiago de Cuba. It was founded in 1939 by Francisco Cobas la O (Pancho Cobas), director, with Emilia Gracia, Rigoberto Hechaverría (Maduro) and Rey Caney (Reinaldo Hierrezuelo la O). The original style was traditional trova, with boleros and some música campesina (countryside music). In due course, the members and the music changed. By far the greatest change was the arrival of Eliades Ochoa, who has proved to be an inspired choice.Ochoa was invited by Cobas to become leader in 1978, and, before accepting, he got agreement to introduce new musical works into the repertoire. At that time Cobas continued with the group, and Hilario Cuadras and Amado Machado joined. Ochoa introduced the son as the staple diet of the group, and beefed up the percussion to balance the guajiro content with an African element. Even more important was his personal qualities. He is a truly outstanding acoustic guitarist, with a warm singing style. For all that, it took a long time for music lovers outside Cuba to hear about the group. In the series of albums Ochoa played an increasingly prominent part, and this was reflected in increased sales for the Cuarteto Patría albums, and in many foreign tours for the man and his group.

36,90 €*
Sunburst - Ave Africa (DOLP)
180g vinyl, incl. bonus CD's, Collection of recordings from one of Tanzania’s most revered but short-lived bands of the 1970s, Sunburst. Covering their entire output from 1973 to 1976, this first retrospective features music from their 45 RPM singles on Moto Moto and TFC label, as well as their sole album, "Ave Africa", and an unreleased radio session recorded in Tanzania in 1973. This release comprises of the double vinyl and a copy of the CD version, which contains extra tracks.

26,90 €*
Robert Y Su Banda - Soy La Ley (LP)
"Released in 1978, “Soy la ley” by Robert y su Banda is an obscure but sought-after slab of Colombian salsa dura with the special distinction of having the “original” version of Álvaro José “Joe” Arroyo’s monster hit ‘Rebelión’ hidden in plain sight on the second side of the record. The band’s leader, Roberto Antonio Urquijo Fonseca, is still active today and, hailing from Barranquilla, Colombia, is as steeped in the costeño sound of cumbia as he is in salsa. Roberto certainly has a perfect voice for salsa, bringing to mind that of the Boricua super star sonero Héctor Lavoe. In fact, Roberto y su Banda are well remembered by salsa fanatics in Medellín because they were the other act (along with Piper Pimienta and his orchestra) that opened the first Colombian performance of Héctor Lavoe, on the afternoon of July 29, 1978 at the Plaza de Toros La Macarena. Roberto was also one of the vocalists and co-founders (with Hernando Barbosa) of the short-lived La Bandita, where he was known as “Urquijo” and had a big hit with ‘Libre soy’ in 1979. Prior to that, Roberto replaced Juan Piña in Los Hermanos Martelo in 1975 and later joined Grupo Raíces in the 1980s for a couple of albums. He also became a vocalist with Grupo Niche when Alfonso “Moncho” Santana quit, though he left without appearing on any Niche releases. On this album the previously mentioned ‘Rebelión’ of Joe Arroyo kicks off side two but bears the completely different title ‘El Mulato’ and is credited to Adela Martelo de Arroyo, Joe Arroyo’s wife at the time (Arroyo was signed exclusively to Discos Fuentes). The arrangement, by Enrique Aguilar, is also quite different from ‘Rebelión’ with an introduction that sounds inspired by Tite Curet Alonso’s composition ‘Plantación adentro’ (from “Willie Colon Presents Rubén Blades Metiendo Mano!”, 1977) but it contains all the elements of Joe’s later global smash with the exception of being rhythmically more of a cumbia than a salsa. At the time it was not promoted by Zeida as a hit, with only one 45 single being released from the album, featuring two songs by Colombian composers, ‘Hijo de gitana’ (a bouncy cumbia by Juvenal Viloria) and a smoking salsa version of Joaquín Bedoya’s ‘Déjala que se vaya’. Arroyo is said to have presented ‘El mulato’ to Fruko (his bandleader at the time), and it was recorded but was shelved due to a vocal take that Fruko deemed sub-par. When Arroyo left Fruko y sus Tesos and formed his own band, La Verdad, producer Isaac Villanueva looked through the Fuentes archives for material and stumbled on the original Fruko recording. Arroyo decided to re-record the whole song, changing the intro (to avoid any legal issues with Curet Alonso) and the title to clarify the main theme: the injustice of slavery and black resistance to it. And so, with Michi Sarmiento’s brilliant arrangement plus La Verdad’s modern reinterpretation of the nearly decade old tune, ‘Rebelión’ became a mega-hit even in Asia and Africa and Arroyo’s fame shot around the world and made him the international legend he remains to this day, eight years after his untimely demise. Besides the aforementioned ‘El mulato’, the title track ‘Soy la ley’ is a dance floor burner and comes from the pen of Joe Arroyo as well, as does ‘Mi cariño no espera’, which is another cumbia/salsa hybrid. To these ears, one of the voices singing coro (chorus) on the album sounds a lot like Joe Arroyo, who was Roberto’s friend from back in the early 70s when Arroyo sang with Colombia’s La Protesta. Aside from the Arroyo originals, there is the super hot guaguancó ‘Son Candela’ by the venerable Cuban singer/composer Joseíto Fernández, the guajira son ‘En la inmensa soledad’, made famous by Los Compadres, the upbeat sounding lament ‘Preso sin sentencia’, originally by Puerto Rican plenero and percussionist Rafael Ortiz Escuté (aka Joe Pappy), plus an absolutely burning version of Mexican crooner Armando Manzanero’s 1967 hit ‘Aquel señor’. The record is rounded out by the salsa tune ‘Si ella pregunta por mí’, which was covered in 1980 by Orquesta Borinquen."

19,90 €*
Sharhabil Ahmed - The King Of Sudanese Jazz (LP)
We're super happy to announce the release by Sharhabil Ahmed, the actual King of Sudanese Jazz (he actually won that title in a competition in the early 1970s). Sonically it sounds very different from what Jazz is understood to sound like outside of Sudan. It’s an incredible unique mix of rock’n’roll, funk, surf, traditional sudanese music and influences from Congolese sounds. Original copies of Sharhabil recordings are often hard to find, so we’re happy they will now be widely available. Sharhabil was born in 1935 and he is the founding father of the Sudanese Jazz scene. His aim was to modernize Sudanese music by bringing it together with western influences and instrumentation like he summarized it himself in a 2004 interview for „Al Ahram Weekly“: “[...]Haqiba music, you know, was traditional vocal music with little accompaniment beyond a tambourine. When our generation came in the 1960s, we came with a new style. It was a time of worldwide revolution in music. In Europe, the rhythms of swing and tango were being replaced by jazz, samba, rock- and-roll. We were influenced by this rejuvenation in Sudan, too. I started out by learning to play the oud and traditional Sudanese music, and got a diploma from the music institute of Khartoum University. But my ambition was to develop something new. For this, the guitar seemed like the best instrument. Western instruments can approximate the scales of Sudanese music very well. After all, a lot of Western music is originally from Africa. I have absorbed different influences, from traditional Sudanese rhythms to calypso and jazz, and I hold them together in my music with no difficulty.” Referring to its sonic apperance, Sudanese Jazz hasn’t too much in common with the western idea of Jazz. Sharhabil’s sound feels more like a unique combination of surf, rock n roll, funk, Congolese music and East African harmonies a.o. So it kind of made sense to me, while visiting him in Sudan, to see the records he kept over the years: 2 of his own and 2 by Mulatu Astatke signed to him, further proving the influence of Ethiopian and other neighboring countries. In fact, Sharhabil was not just one of many Sudanese Jazz artist. He is a king of Jazz, literally, since in he won a competion over other artists for that title.

22,90 €*